LCO Environmental Film Festival – January 26, 2011

Lac Courte Oreilles James “Pipe” Mustache Auditorium
Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College
Hayward, WI, USA
Wednesday, January 26, 2011
Topic: Treaty Rights

10 am – Visit InformationBooths/Displays
10:15 – Opening Prayer
10:30 – Guest Speakers(s): Jim St. Arnold, GLIFWC, Fred and Mike Tribble (Invited), LCO Conservation
12 Noon – Potluck (please bring a dish to pass and your own plates/utensils)
1215 pm – Film: “Lighting the 7th Fire”
1:15 pm – Advocacy to Action! How do we make a difference in our community?

“This PBS documentary skillfully weaves together spear fishing treaty rights issues in Wisconsin, the Chippewa prophecy of the 7th Fire and profiles of some of the people helping to bring back the tradition of spear fishing. This video captures a highly significant historical transition and it is the first program in the United States that vividly documents contemporary racism toward Native Americains.” (48 inutes)

Reuse and Recycle for Christmas

Loon by Marilyn Vig

Loon by Marilyn Vig

 Happy Tonics Visitors Center/Store at 25 Fifth Avenue, Shell Lake, WI, has some things to offer for free and many holiday gifts at very little cost. Look at donated art items such as the hand painted loon by Marilyn Vig, stained glass snowflakes and all kinds vintage jewelry.

 Check out women’s winter coats. This is Vintage Wear straight from Washington, DC. Is there a lady out there who has always dreamed of a cashmere coat? Maybe someone has always wanted to dress to the nines with mink trim.  If so Holly Day Saturday may be your day!  Come on in and try on coats. Sizes run from small to medium and the price is low compared to what they are selling on eBay for $99 – $179. If coats don’t sell on December 4, they will be sold in our online store for the going selling rate at http://stores.ebay.com/HAPPY-TONICS

Check out http://ns.sold4uauctions.com/sl/ in Shell Lake, WI, USA. Even auction houses are finding a new way to market reusable and recycled items such as antiques, home decor, clothing for infants and adults. The economic times have never been better for the thrifty minded individual. I went online yesterday and bid on a leather wood carrier and won the bid at $10. I will pick this item up and will not incur on shipping charge. Online auctions are a win, win for seller and buyer both.

Recyling is a global trend. Check out http://stores.ebay.co.uk/cyclerecycleUK in England where they reuse and sell bike parts. Cyclerecycle is now following Happy Tonics Tweets on Twitter. Social networking is the fastest growing selling trend. According to some experts, sales from online stores have grown by 30 percent in 2010. On November 24, CNBC stated that 43.9 percent of comsumers will go online to shop this Christmas.  When Happy Tonics is not selling on Main Street the nonprofit is often fulfilling online orders. Check out our eBay store at http://stores.ebay.com/HAPPY-TONICS

5R Processors Ltd. of Ladysmith, WI has been invited to speak at the December 1 Environmental Film Fest at Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College, 13466 Trepania Road, Hayward, WI, USA. The company is part of e-waste solutions in WI and TN.  5R has drastically reduced e-waste by reusing and recycling thus helping our country’s citizens, landfills, and environment. The company has an online store where the resell electronics also at https://www.5rprocessors.com/productcart/pc/home.asp

Vintage Raggedy Andy and Ann

Vintage Raggedy Andy and Ann

 The Visitors Center/Store at 25 Fifth Avenue is open on Holly Day Saturday from 10 am – 2 pm. Kids can enjoy free Disney films while parents shop. Check out our new and gently reused items. The Andy and Annie ceramic dolls are from the 1970s and look brand new outside of the natural patina.

Happy holidays!

Environmental Film Fest at Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College

Join Happy Tonics, Inc., Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College and the Sustainable Living Institute for the first Annual Event (Nov. 2010 – May 2011). The program takes place on November 3, 2010.  Hope you can join us from 12 noon – 2 p.m. Pot luck, film: Power of Community and Guest speaker.

Address: 13466 Trepania Road, Hayward, WI 54871.

Click on link to view flyer of event:  LCO_EFF_November3

Happy Tonics October 2010 News

 Ryall, M. E. (2010 October 27). Happy Tonics October News. Washburn County Register, p. 9

Marie Basty

Marie Basty

 

Mary Ellen Ryall

Mary Ellen Ryall

October 22 – Mary Ellen Ryall, a 2003 graduate of Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College, Hayward, WI, received a 2010 Outstanding Alumni Award. The award honors an alumni’s outstanding contribution to the college and community.

Marie Basty, was selected to receive the first-ever Alumni Award. Basty graduated in 1996 and was recognized for her personal and professional success. Jason T. Schlender, 2007 Native American Studies graduate, was also honored as a 2010 Outstanding Alumni Award winner.

McNulty children in Happy Tonics Visitors Center/Store

McNulty children in Happy Tonics Visitors Center/Store

 October 15 – Janine McNulty and her young family visited Happy Tonics Visitors Center/Store. The children brought native seed to help seed the Monarch Butterfly Habitat. McNulty works for the LCO Hertel tribal offices.

Janine McNulty talks with Jim VanMoorleham, a volunteer of Happy Tonics.

Janine McNulty talks with Jim VanMoorleham, a volunteer of Happy Tonics.

  She is interested in planting native wildflowers around the tribal buildings in Hertel. She is now able to collaborate with Happy Tonics and LCO in Hayward for leads in how to obtain work study students and interns to assist with this project.

Samuel Tha

Samuel Thayer reaches for salsify leaves.
Samuel Thayer reaches for salsify leaves.

 October 19 – Samuel Thayer’s Wild Edible Class, UW Barron County, Rice Lake campus, was attended by Ryall and Rochelle Becker, a Happy Tonics volunteer. Thayer is the author of The Forager’s Harvest and Nature’s Garden. For the final class, students brought in wild edibles which were cleaned, prepared and added to the community soup pot. We drank hazelnut milk, ate wild fried parsnips and tossed fiddlehead ferns, puffball mushrooms and chopped dandelion roots into the soup pot. For dessert, we had black nightshade berry – some used to think it was poisonous – topping on cheesecake. The meal was fun and delicious. Every student in the class contributed to making a success of the program. Happy Tonics plans to start one of the first Wild Edibles Club in the USA in Shell Lake, spring 2011. Many students of Thayer’s class are interested in being members of the club.

NOTE: I stand to be corrected about shipping Tall Bluestem Native Grass from Happy Tonics online store. Recently I spoke with Dave Vold, of Shell Lake City Hall. He suggested we not ship the seed because it may not be a native plant elsewhere. Tall bluegrass is a native grass more frequent in prairie states. It is used for prairie restoration, soil erosion, water conservation and as a forage plant for deer and cattle. The plant is also used by birds for nest making and seed. Happy Tonics is always willing to listen. Often opinions add to the collective knowledge base.

Happy Tonics September News

Ryall, M. E. (2010, October 6). Happy Tonics September News. Washburn County Register, p. 10

Alex paying attention to learning to identify leaves

Alex paying attention to learning to identify leaves

 There was a Fall Youth Plant Science event at the Spooner Ag Research Station on Saturday October 2, 2010. Area 4-H youth and other youth were invited to attend the event. Happy Tonics is proud to announce that the Pines and Lake Girl Scout Troop of Shell Lake attended. The Girl Scout Troop had a container garden at Friendship Commons this past summer. Offering youth gardening opportunities is one way to jumpstart their interest in gardening. 

Emily experiences pure joy as she catches a falling leaf

Emily experiences pure joy as she catches a falling leaf

Kevin Schoessow, UW-Extension Spooner Area Agriculture Agent and UW-Extension Master Gardener Volunteers lead discussions and demonstrations on making compost, planting garlic, pruning grapes and raspberries and putting the garden to bed. There was a tour of the Spooner Ag Research Station Display gardens were youth learned about the “off the grid” drip irrigation system, powered by an airlift tech pump and windmill and the newly constructed hoop house for season extension. The girls learned something about seed saving and enjoyed tasting fresh fruit, vegetables and berries right from the garden.

Kevin showing a button bottom and a peanut shaped squash

Kevin showing a button bottom and a peanut shaped squash

Happy Tonics exhibited at the Lac Courte Oreilles Convention Center as part of the Wellness Fair and Farmers Market on September 30, 2010. The nonprofit organization is a member of the Green Team at the LCO Tribal College which sponsored the event.  A pumpkin and squash display was on Exhibit. The plants are native to the Americas. A Three Sisters Garden (Corn, beans and squash) was grown in the habitat to teach visitors how heirloom organic crops may have been grown by Native Americans in the prairie of long ago. WOJB did a live interview of the Three Sisters Garden with Mary Ellen Ryall.   Happy Tonics volunteer staff shucked Hidatsa beans and packaged organic herb tea and organic culinary herbs for their online Store at http://stores.ebay.com/HAPPY-TONICS

Happy Tonics received a Matching Gift from Hachette Book Group from Park Avenue, New York, as a match to the donation made by Erica Hohos of Worcester, Massachusetts. The donation will allow us to implement memory pavers around the large wild black cherry tree in the Memory Tree Grove. We will honor Happy Tonics members who have passed on with pavers. The nonprofit organization will invite the public to participate in this upcoming fundraiser. Citizens will be able to purchase an engraved paver in memory of their loved ones including family, friends and pets.

Response to Letter to the Editor – Happy Tonics Board and Officers

The Editorial article by Lauralei Anderson in the paper September 8, 2010 was submitted to Happy Tonics, Inc. officers and board in OH, MA, VA and WI. We agreed to the following response to Lauralei Anderson’s Editorial.

Letter to the editor, Washburn County Register

In regards to the letter sent by Lauralei Anderson from Cumberland, we at the Monarch Butterfly Habitat would like to respond to her criticism calling the habitat “an overgrown railroad bed.”

A native habitat is completely different from a typical garden, park or planting. There are no tulips and marigolds in nice neat rows because all the plants in the habitat are native to Wisconsin. This is a prime example of a restored tall grass prairie whose plants are the same ones that covered Wisconsin when the Conestoga wagons passed through carrying the pioneers west.

It was the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that not only helped pick out the native seeds, but donated over $500 worth of seeds to the habitat and the Land and Water Conservation Department had a huge hand in the project also.

Native plantings always start out with common plants like the little and big blue stems which you call weeds. If the garden is healthy, the first native flowers begin to appear the third year. You mentioned in your letter that you saw some ‘scant black-eyed Susan’s, they are right on time. Within the next 5 years, more native flower species, the seeds of which were planted by professionals, will appear. Some native plants take years for their seeds to germinate and grow into plants.

Even though the habitat idea is new to many here in Shell Lake and the surrounding residents, it’s familiar to those who are familiar with Saulk County’s favorite son, Also Leopold and sites like Brighter Planet. The habitat has received grants from both organizations as well as numerous others that believe that if we don’t save the native plants for the two most important pollinators, the bees and butterflies, commercial crops and public and personal gardens will fail due to a lack of pollination. We will be starting to be official Wisconsin native seed savers this year, sending them throughout the United States.

Shell Lake is also on the direct floral corroder that runs from Canada to Mexico that offers food and rest to the millions of butterflies heading to their winter home in Mexico and yes, the butterflies often follow the highways, another reason for this perfect habitat site.

It’s often easy to criticize what we don’t understand, and this habitat was never meant to look like a ‘cute little garden,’ it’s a teaching tool that has already tied into Eco Tourism and we have given many tours this summer to a local audience as well as visitors from across our nation. The Monarch Habitat also sponsors Earth Day activities each year which encourage locals to buy locally.

Articles about the habitat have not only been published nationally, the habitat is also part of the international world with blog responders from 72 different countries who understand why it exists.

If you watch television, you will see the habitat featured on Discover Wisconsin three times during the next two years, starting March 2011. The habitat is all over their website and print material and calendars as well as the official Wisconsin Tourism Site.

All the beautiful little gardens you mentioned in your letter require constant up-keep from weeding to watering to fertilizing, to the applying of pesticides and for some, mowing.

The habitat is ‘green’ in more ways than one because native plants live with or without our help. The habitat leaves absolutely no carbon footprint.

We would encourage you to take a tour of this amazing place; to step back in history for a bit and enjoy the many kinds of butterflies that already visit the habitat daily.

Mary Ellen Ryall, Executive Director

Response to Argumenative Article – Letter to the Editor

Last week the Monarch Butterfly Habitat received bad press from a woman who did not understand the purpose of the habitat. Here is a response from Tabitha Brown, Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College, Hayward, Wisconsin, USA.

Letter to the Editor, Washburn County Register:

In regards to the letter sent by Laureli Anderson from Cumberland, I would like to say VOLUNTEER. Happy Tonics is run by volunteers. No one is paid and it is run off of donations and grants. If you want to make a difference do something about it that is constructive. Happy Tonics butterfly Garden is a nonprofit run by volunteers and if you want to make changes to it then volunteer time or make a donation. That “nice pergola” you mentioned was a donation, and so were those benches begging to be sat upon. As a volunteer I tried to find local artists to donate artwork to add to the sanctuary. Maybe you would be more successful?

Some of the grants used to run the gardens have strict guidelines. Grants by the DNR or the Forestry service have stipulations where only certain plants can be used at the sanctuary. Why is that you may ask? Because the plants used at the Garden are Indigenous to the area and these plants are what local wildlife need since people destroy their natural habitats by planting “cute little gardens.”

A natural habitat does not look like your manicured garden. It is wild and beautiful in its own way if you take the time to study and appreciate it. I volunteer at the Butterfly sanctuary. I study plants and wildlife at the Lac Courte Oreilles Community college. Prairie habitat has been reduced to 1% of what it once was less than 100 years ago. People mow it down for their gardens, homes, and farms. The wildlife that once called it home is being destroyed. Did you know the habitat of Palos Verdes blue butterfly was reduced to the size of a baseball field? Guess what that town did to the habitat? They turned it into a baseball field. Now that butterfly is extinct in the wild.

Shell Lake is taking huge steps towards environmental awareness. The Organization that supports the Butterfly Garden in Shell Lake also provides festivals, seminars, and education on environmental awareness issues. They promote sustainable living.  So next time you visit the habitat keep that in mind. You can also ask for a guided tour and learn about the plants and maybe once you know what they do you can appreciate them as much as I do.

Sincerely,

Tabitha Brown

ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FEST, Hayward, Wisconsin at LCO Convention Center

 
 

Cheekwood Monarch

Monarchs copyright Cindy Dyer, Dyer Design

 

LCO Convention Center, Hayward, Wisconsin
Thursday, May 6th, 2010
Environmental Film Fest

 

Schedule

11:30-12:00pm: Free Luncheon
12:00pm Speaker:  Mary Ellen Ryall, Happy Tonics Inc. on Plight of the Monarch Butterfly and reasons why Happy Tonics creates native habitats for pollinators and migrating butterflies.
12:20pm Film: “Incredible Journey of the Butterflies”
1:20pm Community Discussion – Advocacy to Action

Visit Informational Booths Before and After Film:

How to Build Butterfly & Rain Gardens, Local Foods, Recycling, and more!

This nature documentary from NOVA follows the epic migration of the monarch butterfly over 2000 miles, providing a butterfly’s-eye-view as the two month journey passes over forests, swamps, desserts, and open water, eventually touching down at their destination in Mexico.

Source: http://www.fandango.com/nova:theincrediblejourneyofthebutterflies_v480610/summary

email: maryellen@happytonics.org for more information.

 

  Background photo courtesy of: http://farm1.static.flickr.com/27/52666376_2d5156903c.jpg

Event: Environmental Film Festival at Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College March 11

Join us for the March Environemental Film Fest
LCOOCC, 13466 Trepania, Hayward, Wisconsin

LCOOCC James “Pipe” Mustache Auditorium
Thursday, March 11th, 2010
Lunch Available on Site @ 11:30am for $5 – Provided by LCO Elders Association
12:00pm  Speaker:  Dr. Damian Vraniak
12:30pm Film: “America’s Lost Landscape: The Tall Grass”
1:30pm Community Discussion – Advocacy to Action

Common Sunflower

Common Sunflower at Damian Vraniak's Prairie in Springbrook, WI.

Prior to Euro American settlement in the 1820s, one of the major landscape features of North America was 240 million acres of tall grass prairie, but between 1830 and 1900 the prairie was steadily transformed to farmland.  This change brought about an enormous social change for Native Americans.  The film creates a powerful and moving viewing experience about the natural and cultural history of America.  Loss of prairie and fragmentation is a loss of many species, plant, animal, and human. (57 minutes) 

Save the Dates for Upcoming Environmental Films and Sustainable Living Education!Thursdays –April 22nd and May 6th

For More Information Contact:  Amber Marlow – GIS Lab/ Rm 508 or @ 634-4790 ext 156

 

Environmental Film Festival “King Corn”

Yesterday Happy Tonics was a co-sponsor at the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College’s Film Fest featuring “King Corn.”  Mary Ellen Ryall, Executive Director of the nonprofit spoke about Oneida Corn, a tribal corn, that originated in New York State near Syracuse and Utica.  The corn seed was gifted to the Oneida tribe to the west side of Green Bay, Wisconsin in 1992.

Oneida corn

Oneida tribal corn

In 2009 Oneida corn was grown out by Mike Brenna of Little Footprint Farm, Turtle Lake, Wisconsin.

Mike told me that the Oneida Tribe in Wisconsin gave him some of the corn seed.  He cherished the seed and only gave us three ears.  I take one dried ear with me when I am lecturing. 

Corn silk is medicinal and good for urinary tract infection.  The dried silks can be added to soups and stews.  Ayner Larson (originally from Turkey) told me the silks can be used in tea. 

Phytochemicals:  Maysin, Carvacrol, Flavonoids and Polyphenols make up some of the medicinal properties of corn silk. 

Maysin helps protect the plant from bag bug larva such as European Corn Borer.  What is good for the plant may be good for our own intestinal health. 

Carvacrol may have antibacterial, anti fungal, antiviral and anti-cancer  properties when naturally distilled in liquid.  If corn silks are in a liquid base such as tea, soup and stew, this will allow the phytochemical to release its essence into the liquid.

Flavonioids have antioxidant properties.  Polyphenol also has antioxidant properties.  Rather, they may affect cell-to-cell signaling, receptor sensitivity, inflammatory enzyme activity or gene regulation.

Food sources are more than just a question of eating.  Are we conscious of what we eat?  For example, Oneida corn is a life substance to the Oneida people.  My ancestors came from Ireland and I am tied to the potato.  Being connected to our ancestral food has an effect on our DNR.  We are linked to our past through food.

King Corn points out that corn being grown today is often not for human consumption.  Corn is grown to feed cattle in the concentrated animal feed operations.  It is often grown as a byproduct called corn syrup.  It’s in mayonnaise, ketchup, boxed food and soft drinks.  Corn syrup is a processed product from a non food source. Diabetes is often caused by a diet of high corn syrup.  The closer to the natural food source, the healthier we can be. 

Happy Tonics display featured Tarahumara corn from a remote area of  Sierra Tarahumara, Chihuahua, Mexico.  Growing biodiversity of corn species can keep the landraces alive. There are more types of corn besides yellow sweet corn.  Tribal people understand the importance of growing dent, flour, flint, popcorn and sweet corn. 

Tarahumara serape corn

tarahumara serape corn

 Tarahumara serape corn tassels.  Just look at the beautiful red striked tassels.  This species is a  Flour/Flint Corn.  When dry, flints generally store better and have a great resistance to insect damage.  The kernals can be toasted and ground and popped.

There is more to the corn story.  Visit http://happytonics.org/mbr13b1.htm to read the Colonization of Maize by Mary Ellen Ryall.

Be happy insectamonarca friends where ever you are.

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