LCO ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FESTIVAL SERIES

by Amber Marlow

Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College
James “Pipe” Mustache Auditorium
Wednesday, February 23, 2011

FREE EVENT PUBLIC WELCOME!

12 pm Potluck
(please bring a dish to pass and your own plate/utensils)

12:15 pm Guest Speaker: Alison Kilday
Mobility Manager, Namekagon Transit
12:3o pm – Film: “Fuel”
2.15 pm Advocacy to Action! How do we make a difference in our community?

FUEL is an entertaining and comprehensive look at energy in America: a history of where we have been, our present predicament and a solution to our dependence on foreign oil. Josh Tickell’s stirring, radical and multi-award winning FUEL may be known by some as the ‘little energy documentary,’ but in truth, it’s a powerful portrait of America’s overwhelming addiction to, and reliance on, oil. Rousing and reactionary, this film will leave you feeling hopeful and inspired.” (111 minutes)

Sponsored by Happy Tonics, Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College, Web of Learning Sustainable Living Institute and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

LCO Environmental Film Festival – January 26, 2011

Lac Courte Oreilles James “Pipe” Mustache Auditorium
Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College
Hayward, WI, USA
Wednesday, January 26, 2011
Topic: Treaty Rights

10 am – Visit InformationBooths/Displays
10:15 – Opening Prayer
10:30 – Guest Speakers(s): Jim St. Arnold, GLIFWC, Fred and Mike Tribble (Invited), LCO Conservation
12 Noon – Potluck (please bring a dish to pass and your own plates/utensils)
1215 pm – Film: “Lighting the 7th Fire”
1:15 pm – Advocacy to Action! How do we make a difference in our community?

“This PBS documentary skillfully weaves together spear fishing treaty rights issues in Wisconsin, the Chippewa prophecy of the 7th Fire and profiles of some of the people helping to bring back the tradition of spear fishing. This video captures a highly significant historical transition and it is the first program in the United States that vividly documents contemporary racism toward Native Americains.” (48 inutes)

Looking at Cuba’s Organic Food Movement and More

LCO Green Team Sign Honor the Earth

LCO Green Team Sign Honor the Earth

November 3, 2010, The GreenTeam at Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College, in Hayward, WI, hosted the first in the series of the II Annual Environmental Film Fest. There was a good turnout of instructors in science, natural resources and ethnobotany. The event was hosted by Happy Tonics, Inc, LCOOCC and the Sustainable Living Institute.

 A film “Power of Community” showed how Cuba responded after the collapse of Russia in Cuba.  The country had to face a loss of utilities and industry. Transportation came to a grinding halt. The people went from cars to bicycles, from inported food to growing their own as they suffered a loss of income and petroleum for energy. None the less, the people have something to teach the world. They brought back healthy small agriculture that is no longer dependent upon large agricultureal machines and pesticides and herbicides.

Healthy food is now abundant in Cuba and the soil has been improved by sustainable some agricultural and family garden practices. We can learn something from Cuba. The USA and the rest of the world are now experiencing rising food prices as the global food supply is becoming more expensive and fuel prices keep surging. In Wisconsin many communities are starting to raise their own food. Families are maintaining garden plants. Our small farmers are being respected for the job that they do to bring local food to our tables. I see this movement growing in northwest Wisconsin and I feel proud to live in a community that understands that our security comes from knowing who is growing our food and where we can buy local grown produce that is free of chemicals.   

Teresa Depies, owner Springbrook Organic Dairy

Teresa Depies, owner Springbrook Organic Dairy

Teresa Depies, owner of Springbrook Organic Dairy, was the speaker at the November 3rd event. She raised some interesting points. There are new pasture rules in relationship to how many cows can be in the pasture. It is based on waste management. Teresa raises Jersey cows. They are a smaller breed and have less of a waste management problem than other species of dairy cows. This is a Grade A farm.  Teresa and her husband have been in the business since 1990. She is having success in distributing her milk to local grocery stores. I am proud that Dahlstrom’s Grocery Store in Shell Lake sells Springbrook organic milk.

When we buy from our local farmers we are supporting our own crops, dairy, poultry and grass-fed animals. This allows us to be prepared if we where to find ourselves in a “Food Security Situation.” Preparedness is readiness. The Green Team is busy at work networking a local food system into a viable way to purchase food.

Sierra White, intern from Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College

Sierra White, intern from Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College

 

Welcome Sierra White, a LCOOCC student and environmental education intern of Happy Tonics, Inc. Sierra will be Happy Tonics representative at the monthly Environmental Film Fest. She will assist with marketing, advertising, and recruiting partners for a local food network. Sierra will also assist with a “Day Trip”  itinery and partners with Happy Tonics Monarch Butterfly Habitat.

Environmental Film Festival “King Corn”

Yesterday Happy Tonics was a co-sponsor at the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College’s Film Fest featuring “King Corn.”  Mary Ellen Ryall, Executive Director of the nonprofit spoke about Oneida Corn, a tribal corn, that originated in New York State near Syracuse and Utica.  The corn seed was gifted to the Oneida tribe to the west side of Green Bay, Wisconsin in 1992.

Oneida corn

Oneida tribal corn

In 2009 Oneida corn was grown out by Mike Brenna of Little Footprint Farm, Turtle Lake, Wisconsin.

Mike told me that the Oneida Tribe in Wisconsin gave him some of the corn seed.  He cherished the seed and only gave us three ears.  I take one dried ear with me when I am lecturing. 

Corn silk is medicinal and good for urinary tract infection.  The dried silks can be added to soups and stews.  Ayner Larson (originally from Turkey) told me the silks can be used in tea. 

Phytochemicals:  Maysin, Carvacrol, Flavonoids and Polyphenols make up some of the medicinal properties of corn silk. 

Maysin helps protect the plant from bag bug larva such as European Corn Borer.  What is good for the plant may be good for our own intestinal health. 

Carvacrol may have antibacterial, anti fungal, antiviral and anti-cancer  properties when naturally distilled in liquid.  If corn silks are in a liquid base such as tea, soup and stew, this will allow the phytochemical to release its essence into the liquid.

Flavonioids have antioxidant properties.  Polyphenol also has antioxidant properties.  Rather, they may affect cell-to-cell signaling, receptor sensitivity, inflammatory enzyme activity or gene regulation.

Food sources are more than just a question of eating.  Are we conscious of what we eat?  For example, Oneida corn is a life substance to the Oneida people.  My ancestors came from Ireland and I am tied to the potato.  Being connected to our ancestral food has an effect on our DNR.  We are linked to our past through food.

King Corn points out that corn being grown today is often not for human consumption.  Corn is grown to feed cattle in the concentrated animal feed operations.  It is often grown as a byproduct called corn syrup.  It’s in mayonnaise, ketchup, boxed food and soft drinks.  Corn syrup is a processed product from a non food source. Diabetes is often caused by a diet of high corn syrup.  The closer to the natural food source, the healthier we can be. 

Happy Tonics display featured Tarahumara corn from a remote area of  Sierra Tarahumara, Chihuahua, Mexico.  Growing biodiversity of corn species can keep the landraces alive. There are more types of corn besides yellow sweet corn.  Tribal people understand the importance of growing dent, flour, flint, popcorn and sweet corn. 

Tarahumara serape corn

tarahumara serape corn

 Tarahumara serape corn tassels.  Just look at the beautiful red striked tassels.  This species is a  Flour/Flint Corn.  When dry, flints generally store better and have a great resistance to insect damage.  The kernals can be toasted and ground and popped.

There is more to the corn story.  Visit http://happytonics.org/mbr13b1.htm to read the Colonization of Maize by Mary Ellen Ryall.

Be happy insectamonarca friends where ever you are.

Day Four – Ringing the Bell for Brighter Planet Grant

We’re almost there at 81 VOTES at 9:10 p.m.  Only 19 more VOTES to go till we reach 100.  Yeah Team!  If you are watching the results and have voted once, you are entitled to two more votes.  Each voter can vote three times.  If you are new please REGISTER AND VOTE AT http://brighterplanet.com/project_fund_projects/100 for Climate Change Native Habitat and Community Garden Shell Lake. 

Monarch Butterfly Habitat Sign

Got Milkweed? Sign made by Matt with DNR Grant

milkweed

Wild milkweed meadow Go Wild with Butterflies

I thought you might be interested in the DNR Monarch Butterfly Habitat that Happy Tonics has land use for a seasonal habitat.  Just look at the milkweed.  Native milkweed is the only host plant of the monarch butterfly and this meadow is full of milkweed.   Here is a photo of our sign that Matt made last year with a small grant from the Spooner DNR.

Today we want to thank Paul DeMain, Editor of News from Indian Country, for voting and passing the word along.  Please read Nick Vander Puy’s interview with Dawn White on the Importance of Water. 

Happy Tonics is a co-sponsor of the Environmental Film Festival.   We heard from Belinda Bowling, Owner Innkeeper, Casa Escondida Bed & Breakfast in Chimayo, New Mexico at http://www.casaescondida.com/

Sandy Stein and I had the pleasure of staying at the Casa when we were exhibiting at Tesuque Pueblo, New Mexico, in 2008.  Facebook friend Amy Lou Jenkins, author of Every Natural Fact Five Seasons of Open Air Parenting also voted for our grant proposal.  The book has not been released yet but can be pre-ordered.  We like to make friends all along the way.  So many individuals have emailed to say they have voted and we are deeply honored.  You never know who your friends are until you need them.

 Till tomorrow, keep up the good work.  REGISTER AND VOTE for Happy Tonics.  We love hearing from you.

LCO Tribal College to Host Environmental Film Series

LCOOCC James “Pipe” Mustache Auditorium, Thursday, January 28, 2010

Free event—public welcome!

Lake Superior

Lake Superior

Pre-Activity; LCOOCC Ice Fishing Event, Friday, Jan 22, 9:00 a.m., Grindstone—South Landing

12:00 p.m. Potluck (remember to bring your plate!)

12:30 p.m. Speaker: Gladyce Nahbenayash

1:00 p.m. Film: Flow

Irena Salina’s award-winning documentary investigation into what experts label the most important political and environmental issue of the 21st century—The World Water Crisis. Salina builds a case against the growing privatization of the world’s dwingling fresh water supply with an unflinching focus on politics, pollution, human rights, and the emergence of a domineering world water cartel. (64 minutes)

Save the dates for Upcoming Environmental Films and Sustainable Living Education!

Thursdays—February 18, March 11, April 22, and May 6. For more information, contact Amber Marlow, GIS Lab/Rm 508 or #534-4790, ext 156.

Irena Salina’s award-winning documentary investigation into what experts label the most important political and environmental issue of the 21st century—The World Water Crisis. Salina builds a case against the growing privatization of the world’s dwingling fresh water supply with an unflinching focus on politics, pollution, human rights, and the emergence of a domineering world water cartel. (64 minutes)

Save the dates for Upcoming Environmental Films and Sustainable Living Education!

Thursdays—February 18, March 11, April 22, and May 6. For more information, contact Amber Marlow, GIS Lab/Rm 508 or #534-4790, ext 156.


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Lakeland Manor Hosts 1st Environmental Film of 2010

Happy Tonics, Inc. is sponsoring the II Annual Winter Environmental Film Festival in Washburn and Sawyer County, Wisconsin. USA.

Viewing insect world

Life is a mystery in the understory.

The first host site was Lakeland Manor.  The senior housing residence showed MicroCosmos a film produced in France.  The movie shows the little seen world of insects in the USA and the rain forests of Latin America.  Beautiful closeup photography.  Event took place on 15 January 2010.

St. Richelle, guests and Gretal

Darling Gretal goes to the movies

We had a good turn out of residents and guests.  Oh yes, our little pets enjoy being with us during film viewings especially when cookies are served.

I want some cookies

Buddy was more interested in the cookies that were served.Little Gretal goes to the movie

EVENTS – II Annual Winter Environmental Film Festival January 2010

II Annual Winter Environmental Film Festival – JANUARY 2010

January 28 – Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College, 13346 Trepania Road, Hayward.  Local fresh caught fish to be served at NOON day meal.  Speaker from Red Cliff Reservation will share update on toxic waste dumping in Lake Superior at 12:10 p.m.  Gladyce Nahbenayash speaks at 12:30 and film at 1 p.m.   Environmental film Flow to be shown. Film addresses global Indigenous water rights, water purity, privatization and pollution.  College students plan to go ice fishing on January 22 to catch the main course.  American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) will cook the fish for the pot luck meal.  Guest speaker Gladyce Nahbenayash will speak on the sacredness of water.   FREE.   Open to the public.

Silver Lake

Silver Lake

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