Living on Earth: The Collapse of Western Civilization

Living on Earth: The Collapse of Western Civilization.

Today I went out to my sister’s colonial farm. I brought my birch bark clapping sticks and some corn meal to put down. It was softly raining as I walked up though the woods on the foot trodden trail. I felt I was being led to honor my friend Worth Cooley-Prost who is ascended now with other masters. I just could feel her wanting me to do a Water Ceremony and so I walked up to the Wild Butterfly Habitat where I have my own refuge in a field. My chair was there and I was happy to be able to sit down for a respite.

Sacred gourd

Sacred gourd and clapping sticks

I knew that I would gather my crystal rock and pipe-stone from a sacred Ojibwe place. I didn’t want to leave them behind  knowing that I was moving. I want my sacred things around me. Personally I would rather have my sticks and twigs than furniture. They comfort me and give me strength.

In the clearing I began in the four directions. I chanted the water chant to Nibi Wabo and felt I was honoring the rain as it gently fell and that my friend was pleased.

nibiwabo (2)

There is also a stained glass hanging container that an elder friend made years ago. I thought about it and wondered what I would do with it in my new home? A light-bulb went off. I will hang it from a window and put water in it. It will remind me daily to set my intentions in my own residence. I will offer ceremony for the  purity of water, that it will remain abundantly with the Earth, even though it is quickly disappearing at an alarming rate. I will continue to bless the water. She wants to be honored. We should never  forget this life giving gift to all Beings that live on the planet.

A visit to tranquility

A visit to tranquility

We must never stop protecting her from pollution, toxins, nuclear waste, plastic, and sewage.  She allows us to live as well as the trees, plants, birds, fish, and animals that often sacrifice themselves for us.

 

 

Ode to a Visionary Water Friend Worth-Cooley Prost

Recently I learned that Worth Cooley-Prost walked on. She was a visionary when it came to creating her art. Worth worked with glass, but not just glass. She honored water as a living Being that should be loved, prayed for, and protected.

worth enlarged photo

A few years ago, I received a surprise package in the mail at my home in Minong, WI. I had no idea who sent me the box because I hadn’t met Worth yet. She was one of my readers to this Blog. Worth knew from reading my posts that I was a council member of the Sisterhood of Water Rites. Sending the box to me was one way for her to honor water and the women who are protectors of water.

water Hans free domain

Within the box was a lovely hand made glass pennant on a wire necklace. It literally sparkled in the sun. I was overcome. In the moment, I sent her a thank you note. We then became friends on Facebook.

jewelry Worth Cooley-Prost

In 2012 I flew to Washington, DC, from Wisconsin. I went to honor my friend Cindy Dyer who was having a one woman photography exhibit at Green Springs Botanic Garden in Fairfax, VA. I called Worth and asked her to join us. Another artist friend Deneen Stambone drove us to Green Springs from Springfield, VA. Worth parked her car after greeting us at the door and I walked over to the vehicle. Matter-of-fact, she handed me a pair of earrings that went with the necklace she gave me earlier. I couldn’t get over it. I mean it was such a surprise to receive the necklace with glass pennant in the first place and now this? I was stunned.

Worth honored water. She saw a better world through Ceremony and joined the Sisterhood Water Ceremony group out in WI, even though she lived in Arlington, VA. We would coordinate our time when we offered Water Ceremony.

moss

moss in frozen water = snow

Sometimes I am so unaware. For example, yesterday it rained all day. Niki Bresnahan and I met at the Sundial Community Garden, in Fitchburg, MA, and we transplated tomatoes and planted more beans in the gentile rain. We love to play in the rain. Why I didn’t think of Worth as blessing my day is beyond me. I realize it this morning. I was out there in the garden with a water friend and we were playing in the rain and loving our plants that were being nourished with nitrogen rich rainwater.

Miigwetch (thank you in Ojibwe) Worth for all the gifts of heart from here and beyond. Energy never dies. It always transforms. As a Monarch Butterfly that goes through transformation, we do also change and live on.

worth lizards

Worth Cooley-Prost created these lizards and I fell in love with them. Lizards love water.

Thank you Worth for the gifts of spirit and intentions that you gave us. Our time together was brief but eternal as I know you continue to send me blessings, such as the rain yesterday and a surprise online donation came to the nonprofit Happy Tonics at www.happytonics.com

I have kept a vigil candle lit for 24 hours to honor my dear friend. I do believe that we receive many blessings from other parallel universes and Worth is sending her love to who those of us who are so fortunate to live here in the present on this sacred planet.

A Walk on the Wild Side

China my pal

China my pal

It is a balmy May day today. I took the bus out to Winter Hill Farm, Ashby West Road, Fitchburg. No one was home. Good plan. I had the farm to myself for a few hours. Let China, 11 year old cat out. She loves it when I come and wants to pal around with me.  A mourning cloak butterfly flew into lilac and a yellow tiger swallowtail was seen flitting about on flowers in the front yard. It is only May and the swallowtails are here. This is early.

ladyslipper

ladyslipper

Picked up my bamboo poles, a pail with fresh composted earth and aged manure, a trowel and my seeds. And out to the Wild Butterfly Habitat I went.  Removed some blackberry bramble and cleared a small area. Put plastic down, I hated to, but I didn’t have any newspaper. Instead I put my composed  soil on top and firmly planted seeds. My hope is that the seeds will germinate and I will be able to transplant them to a better soil preparation that I will undertake over the next few weeks.

I came back to the barn and pulled up a lawn chair to sit on and ate my bagel with cream cheese and chives and drank from a bottle of water. A short while later my brother in law came out of the house. He had arrived home from work when I was up in the woods.

Jack offered me a ride on the ATV and I hitched a ride back up to the woods. This time I was headed to Frog Pond. He left me where the trail forked because there are too many rocks and boulders to cross over. Then I headed out by foot and found the trail that leads to the pond.

 

Lobilia cardinalis

Lobilia cardinalis

There with memories of the past in Lusby, So. MD, and my friend Audrey Scharmen, a writer and plant friend, I planted beloved Lobilia cardinalis. The cardinal plant likes to have her feet wet and head in the sun. I planted her in the peat moss and decayed leaf compost. I hope they make it. I have waited so long  to have another encounter with one of my favorite plants that still clings to my memories of beautiful things in my life.

Water Ceremony

Recently, I walked out to the Cathedral in the Pines. There was a foot of snow on the ground as I hiked out to Wild Butterfly Habitat just beyond a pine grove and hardwood forest. I had to stop several times to catch my breath.

I went out to do a Water Ceremony in communion with Bad River Reservation and Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College and Lac Courte Oreilles Reservation. They held a Water is Alive Ceremony and Pow Wow today at LCO Convention Center. We stand up for the Earth and are protesting Iron Ore Mine proposed at headwaters of 23 waterways through Bad River Reservation, which will pollute water all the way out through other communities also and Lake Superior.

Fresh drinking water is a gift for all living species be it human, animal, insect, plants, trees, bees and fish. Water is for all species. I played my clapping sticks as I chanted the song for the Water Ceremony. I put down corn meal that had previously been prayed with. Also I brought stale bread for the birds.

Beech leaves quivered and white pine tree needles danced in a breeze. The sun peeked out behind a cloud to be with us. And the Earth was made happy.

Alberta Canada Indigenous Keystone XL Pipeline Tar Sands Struggle

I am posting this link because I believe that each person needs to learn what is at stake with the Alberta Keystone XL Pipeline Tar Sands struggle. The immediate consequences may not affect us yet but it will over time.

Let us learn from Indigenous communities that have already suffered from consequences of mining and contamination of water on tribal lands. If you want to know what is happening to your neighbors in North Dakota and Pennsylvania, listen to the people speak about ruination of mountains and how ground water is already impacted. I have heard them. It is hideous to think that multi-national corporations could even think of defacing the Earth in such a selfish way and for such a selfish end. MONEY, MONEY, MONEY.

The USA is not leading the world in alternative energy, rather it is still trying to extract dirty fuel. It must STOP. Many citizens in this country understand that we are at a pivital moment. We can walk into sustainability or we can watch the natural world being destroyed and what will protect us then?

If you want to know about fracking or privatization of bottled water watch Tapping, Blue Gold and Gasland.

The best site for watching videos on the protest in Washington, DC to stop the Alberta Canada XL Pipeline Tar Sands is at Indigenous Environmental Network at http://www.ienearth.org/index.html

We may not be given a second chance. It is now that the tipping point is being reached. We need to protect nature, which in turn gives us life. Nature is not dependent upon humans to survive. It is the other way around.

Visit http://www.ienearth.org/index.html to start learning about this threatening danger.

DR. EMOTO’S WATER MESSAGE FROM JAPAN FOR JULY 25, 2011

Wisconsin Point, Lake Superior

Wisconsin Point, Lake Superior

July 25 will be a World Prayer Day. You can listen to Dr. Emoto telling about a sacred shrine in Japan and sacred water. Let us all offer prayers and water on July 25. Listen and see video at  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqCXpbU4Z0o

Please let us all stand together on July 25th either in circle or on your personal time to give blessings to our waters, and prayer for World. Peace for our Mother Earth..
The Sisterhood of the Planetary Water Rites has just now received this notice through our Sister in Utah, Paula DeJoshua of www.intothelightinlove.com
Let us do the best we can at this late notice to comply with Dr. Emoto’s wishes…
Waterblessings to All,
Grandmother Whitedeer

Reflections on the Mother Earth Water Walkers

by John Schneider, June 12, 2011

I watched the ceremony on the Lake Superior shore yesterday of the convergence of the Water Walk. Luckily I got there early and had time to run along the beach and soak and meditate in the lake before I ran up the road from the beach and caught up with the group coming down to the lake. I was tuned into the experience from the point of view of the lake, and from years of running daily
in the wilderness and swimming in lakes and rivers. And from the point of view of opposition to the mine that would send runoff and bring bilge spewing pollution from ore freighters on that beach. And level mountaintops (nearly weathered by time to hills) to feed industry, industry that should already feed from recycled metal first, but doesn’t. And be powered by Lake Superior ind/wave
power melting and recycling materials with zero carbon pollution in the atmosphere and no acid rain in the rivers and lakes.

But thanks to a Facebook friend I never met before, and her guide to the ceremony, a young native girl, and several kids swimming and wading in the mother lake. And several moms comments….but especially a 6 year old who was barefoot and remarked as I was putting my running shoes back on after swimming, “Oh I should have brought my shoes down too..” I realized the point of view of
my childhood again, I had camped in that very same area with my family as a kid, and still I think that trip is in my dreams.

Mother Earth Water Walkers Bad River copyright Jennifer

Mother Earth Water Walkers Bad River copyright Jennifer

Dream on… this is looking through their eyes, the children and their mothers and grandmothers hopes for them…And then!! The great moment for me.. a small thing, but I happened to be right there where the boats would land with the Water Walkers.. the grandmothers….A man stepped up and asked if I would help pull the boats up. A great honor.. a few of us pulled together. Wonderful experience I will meditate on for years… Then I went to the North Country Trail at Upson Lake to explore the Penokees where they would be effected by mining run off. These mountains are wonderful. Their waters are beautiful; I meditated
beside a stream on the trail, watching the intricate insect life. I saw butterflies sucking moisture from mud on Upson Lake boat landing, now to explore this whole area via the trail and get others there too. We need to draw inspiration to fight the mine and fight for those precious waters feeding our very lives and the life web we inhabit.

Mother Earth Water Walkers Press Release

Press Release – For Immediate Release

Ottawa, ON (17 May 2011) – The Native Women’s Association of Canada is acknowledging with the highest esteem the Grandmothers and other supporters who are walking from the four oceans that surround North America. The leaders of the Water Walk carry copper vessels that contain the “healing and sacred salt water” from the Pacific Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, the Atlantic Ocean, and from Hudson Bay that will be used in a ceremony where the waters converge in Bad River, Wisconsin on June 12, 2011. The water will then be united in Lake Superior where the first Water Walk began in 2003.

Water is a life force that has been respected and honoured through ceremony since time immemorial by the world’s Indigenous peoples. With this respect it is of growing concern that many Indigenous people and others around the world do not have access clean drinking water.

The women in the Water Walk, many whom are Elders have taken on a physically daunting campaign journeying over 10,400,000 steps to raise awareness about the crisis. Like many great concerns it is the women who lead and give voice to the issue.

The Anishinaabe, also known as the Ojibwe, Odawa and Potawatomi, are the caretakers of the eastern woodlands and Great Lakes, the largest freshwater system on Earth. Anishinaabe women, as givers-of-life, are responsible for speaking for, protecting and carrying our water.” (Mother Earth Water Walk, 2011)

NWAC, NGO’s and government officials are listening and will respond. You too can support the walkers! For more information see http://www.motherearthwaterwalk.com/ and follow them on Facebook.

Bird blown on the winds of time

Today in Minong, Wisconsin, USA, the winds blew approximately 40 mph. It was enough to snatch a baby bird from its nest and hurl the small bird down in my back yard. From where the bird was carried is a mystery. I saw the baby bird on the lawn from my window and went out to investigate. The fledgling got scared and tried to fly. The bird could only make minute flights close to the ground. I kept my eye on the bird throughout the day.

Early this afternoon I went out and saw that the baby was not moving. The bird opened and blinked its eyes and I knew that it lived; however, I also knew that it could not fly now. Perhaps it suffered some internal injury. I sang the baby bird an honor song. Then I found a live worm and carried it to the bird on a straw strand. I thought the bird might be hungry and thirsty. At this point I also brought a small lid filled with water to tempt the bird.

baby bird

Farewell baby bird

  By 4 p.m. the baby bird had died. I bent down and kissed its tiny head the color of fall leaves. It felt warm. The body was black with tinges of blue and green.  The color could only be seen from a close position.  The bird with closed eyes blew over and I noticed one foot curled and the other straight. I dug a hole and gently placed the small bird in along with sacred tobacco that was used in earlier morning ceremony prayers.

I thought about the mother. She would never know what happened to her baby bird and my heart wept.

Hopi Elders give message to world

via Lee Wayne Lomayestews, Village Chief and YouTube video.

This link has a message that we all need at this time. We are experiencing a world that is changing and we need words of knowledge and wisdom from the Elders.

Please listen and watch at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buMD1Qi_fNw

« Older entries

%d bloggers like this: