A must see sustainability video

This video is a must see for anyone who knows we need to change as a world society and to commit to living sustainably at http://buff.ly/19fERZh

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(Unidentified) beetle on Chicory bloom

Cindy Dyer posted photograph of beetle on chicory. One can see tiny specks of white pollen on beetle at http://cindydyer.wordpress.com/

According to Mary Holland, author of Naturally Curious, “Twenty minutes of observing air-borne visitors to a patch of roadside Chicory revealed nine different species of pollinators, including bees, flies and beetles. Most of the insects were bees, which makes sense, as honeybees, leafcutting bees and ground-nesting bees are the primary pollinators of this flower. Without exception, all of the pollinating insects were covered from head to toe with Chicory’s white pollen grains. As they circled the flowers’ stamens collecting pollen, the insects’ bodies were inadvertently dusted with some of it. Thanks to these diligent pollen-collectors and transporters, American Goldfinches and other seed-eating birds will be feeding on Chicory seeds come winter.”

Exciting! ME

Cindy Dyer's Blog

I photographed this red headed fellow at one of the McKee-Beshers sunflower fields this morning, alongside my fellow avid photographers, Heather Callin, Michael Powell and Marisa Sarto.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

RedHeadBeetleChicory lorez

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Katydid

Cindy Dyer is outside peeking at insects again.

Cindy Dyer's Blog

My friend Michael and I think this might be a tiny Handsome Meadow Katydid nymph (Orchelimum pulchellum) because of the blue tint to the eyes. I photographed it at McKee-Beshers Wildlife Management Area this morning.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

HandsomeMeadowKatydid

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Dragonfly event PRESS RELEASE

Copyright Cindy Dyer

Copyright Cindy Dyer

I will be doing a talk on dragonflies July 27 at Gateway Park, Natural Pollinator Habitat, Fitchburg, MA. I have seen dragonflies mating where they attached, it looked like a heart shape.

Saturday July 27 – 10 am

Learn about Dragonflies
Natural Pollinator Habitat, Gateway Park
Corner of Sheldon and West Street

Learn about dragonfly eyes, which wrap around the head.
What do dragonflies see? What do dragonflies eat?
Learn how to count and identify dragonflies.

Bring sun screen, hat, lawn chair if possible, water, notepad and pencil.

Event sponsored by Butterfly Woman Publishing and CMAAC

RSVP

Mary Ellen Ryall
Butterfly Woman Publishing
www.butterflywomanpublishing.com
Email: butterflywomanpublishing@gmail.com
29 Merriam Parkway # 906
Fitchburg, MA 01420
978 696-5063

Damselflies Laying Eggs

This is interesting, the mating practice of Damselflies.

 

Naturally Curious with Mary Holland

damselfly laying eggs2 354The two damselflies in this photograph have mated, but the male is still clasping the back of the female’s head so as to guard her and prevent her from receiving the sperm of another male before she is through laying eggs. Damselflies lay their eggs both in the water as well as in plants. The pictured female (bottom damselfly) is in the act of using her ovipositor (thin black structure at tip of abdomen) to puncture a cattail leaf and insert her 1 mm- long egg into the plant tissue. If you look closely, you will see holes in the leaf blade above the hole she’s currently making, where she has previously laid eggs. Thousands of these holes may be drilled and eggs inserted into them during her brief life.

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A peek inside a stingless beehive…

A peek inside a stingless beehive….

Australia’s own native bees and the awesome nest that looks like architecture. Amazing. Keep Buzzing…….

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