Wisconsin GOP Votes To Break Native American Treaties January 27, 2012

This news come from Segway Jeremy Ryan

This [Iron Ore Min

Iron Ore Mine would leave NW WI with this destruction

Iron Ore Mine would leave NW WI with this destruction

ing] bill is far too broad and allows for a $12 billion mine that would destroy Northern Wisconsin. Northern Wisconsin currently has a lot of natural beauty. There are also several tribes in this area, all of which have Federal peace treaties. Many of the tribes showed up today as the Assembly debated the bill. They worry for their land, their air, and their water. Smaller mines than this one have caused major issues. But rather than work with the tribes and local people, Republican Representative Jeff Stone said it was not his job to provide a seat at the table for tribes. They kept the bill as is.

Tribal land is considered its own sovereign nation. As with every sovereign nation, we have treaties so that we can keep the peace. It was agreed, by treaty, that these tribes would not have their resources infringed upon. This mine, however, would destroy their water and air, breaking the Federal treaty and declaring war on a sovereign nation. Treaties are not optional. The passage of this bill literally and legally declares war on the tribes of the north.

One day longer. One day stronger.

Happy Tonics, Inc., an environmental education organization and public charity,  is standing with the Bad River Reservation to stop the Iron Ore Mine near Bad River Reservation. Personally, I am standing with the tribe because Northwest Wisconsin is my home. I want Northwest Wisconsin to stay pristine for future generations. I do not want the water to become contaminated. I say NO to the Iron Ore Mine. I am a graduate of the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College in Hayward, WI.

Read the full article at http://www.addictinginfo.org/2012/01/27/wisconsin-gop-votes-to-break-native-american-treaties/

 

 

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Bad River is having a difficult time defending their rights

against the mining companies. I speak most specifically about the Iron Ore Mine that will be an open pit mine. The mining company will remove the face of the mountain. This is disrespectful and an insult not only to tribal people but to many of us that make Northwest Wisconsin our home.

We live here to be part of the Earth. Now the mining companies and natural gas/oil companies are moving into WI as if we were the new Third World. We have been fighting against the mines for months now.

Still the State Assembly passed the mining bill. There was no regard to tribal treaties which makes me believe that Indigenous lawyers need to respond. I believe that tribes have the right to stop a mine from being build on land above the tribe. Bad River Reservation has 43 waterways that run though the tribe and out to Lake Superior. Bad River watershed needs to be protected.

Listen to the US Fish and Wildlife Service and what the agency is responsible for. It appears that they better help the tribe resolve the mining issue because most assuredly, it will affect the tribe and all others in this part of Northwestern Wisconsin.

YouTube at

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5oCHVdR2nYg&feature=youtu.be

Rav’n Art Exhibit honors published authors in Northwest Wisconsin

Rav'n Art Exhibit copyright Anna Martineau Merritt

Rav'n Art Exhibit copyright Anna Martineau Merritt

The St. Croix Writers Group of Solon Springs, WI, is being honored by Rav’n, Rural Arts Voice North, with an exhibit of published authors. The Exhibit will be on display at Solon Springs Community Center, January – March 2012.

I feel honored that as a member of St. Croix Writrs Group, my book My Name is Butterflyis on display in the Exhibit.

My Name is Butterfly copyright Salt of the Earth PressMy Name is Butterfly copyright Salt of the Earth Press

 

Photo is of exhibit copyright Anna Martineau Merritt, Misty Pine Photography, Gordon, WI.

Volunteerism and donations support a nonprofit

Volunteer Wisconsin is a new state initiative to promote and support volunteerism. As collaboration between the Volunteer Center Association of Wisconsin, the Nonprofit Center of Milwaukee, Volunteer Center of Washington County, Serve Wisconsin and funded by a Volunteer  Generation Fund grant through the Corporation for National and Community Service, Volunteer Wisconsin is the central point for volunteerism and service in the state.

Happy Tonics, Inc. is the first nonprofit in Northwest Wisconsin, Washburn County, to join the organization on January 10, 2012. Volunteer Wisconsin encourages other nonprofit organizations to join. To find out more visit http://www.volunteerwisconsin.org The nonprofit needs a stronger voice to recruit volunteers to the Monarch Butterfly Habitat in season. It is hoped that Volunteer Wisconsin will bring in some new environmental and gardening volunteers.

Lorrie Blockus is planning a Yoga class by donation in January for the Monarch Butterfly Habitat. It is scheduled for Saturday, January 28 at 9:30 a.m. This will be a Yin Yoga class, entitled “The Butterfly Effect” that will be very gentle and incorporate long holds to work joints and energy lines instead of muscles. Great for sore joints and sluggish bodies in the winter (which is a complete Yin season). Yin Yoga takes us deep inside ourselves to be with our thoughts and emotions and physical discomforts as a means of freeing blocked energies, lubricating the joints, and creating positive change within ourselves as a catalyst for positive change for the world. This will take place at the Om Sweet Om Yoga studio at 32 – 5th Avenue, downtown, Shell Lake (LifeCircle Building). Everyone is welcome to learn with Lorrie and to help a nonprofit at the same time.

Butterfly Corner

Black swallowtail butterfly copyright Erin Pryor Pavlica

Black swallowtail butterfly copyright Erin Pryor Pavlica

January 3, 2012 – I received an email asking for help. A black swallowtail butterfly was born in a home in Saint Paul, MN. I could hardly believe it.  How was this possible? Erin Pryor Pavlica needed to know what nectar sources to offer the butterfly. The butterfly formed a chrysalis in November and Erin brought it inside. The butterfly emerged on January 3. Normally butterflies don’t need nectar for 24-48 hours after they emerge. I suggested she try sweet fruit such as an orange and sugar water. Butterflies taste with their feet. The next day, Erin reported that the butterfly did not taste the orange. She was going to try sugar water next.

Erin posted her story on Facebook. Many people around the country answered with suggestions and some had tried similar nectar for butterflies born out of season in their own homes. All agreed that it would be impossible to move the butterfly. There is an average of 560 species of swallowtails. Many are brilliant and live in the tropics. The Monarch Butterfly Habitat in Shell Lake is home to the yellow Canadian Tiger swallowtail in season. Normally the butterfly overwinters outside in the pupal stage. Some swallowtails may spend more than a year like this. I imagine that the home, being heated, was too warm and triggered a different response. Perhaps this is why the butterfly emerged in winter. Surely the butterfly was out of its natural life cycle and habitat.

The black swallowtail is thriving. The butterfly has enjoyed sipping from a rotten old apple and an aged squashed banana. On Saturday, Erin said, “Yes, I have several cotton pads with sugar solution soaked into them. I put fresh solution out several times a day. The butterfly is usually active after eating!”

I would like to mention that Erin had a baby girl, Quinn Mae, on New Year’s Eve. She is thrilled that the black swallowtail butterfly arrived within days of the child’s birth. I invited the family to visit Shell Lake next summer. I look forward to celebrating the butterfly baby at the Native Wildflower and Butterfly Garden. Quinn Mae won’t be the first butterfly baby to be remembered at the Monarch Butterfly Habitat.

January 24 – Environmental Film Fest, 12 Noon, Lac Courte Oreilles (LCO) Ojibwa Community College, 13466 W Trepania Road, Hayward. Film: WATERBUSTER. The film is about the effects of the Gannon Dam on the Missouri River and how a family, which is one of the WATERBUSTER clan, was torn apart and their journey back to wholeness again. Susan Menzel, Tribal collage intern, stated she watched the film and drew parallels about Lac Courte Oreilles history. There was a time when the tribe was flooded to create the Chippewa Flowage in 1924 and the Winter Dam was installed. The Dam was turned over to LCO in the 1970s.  Speaker to be announced.  The event is open to the community.

Here comes censorship if we don’t protest

The momentum behind the anti-SOPA movement has been slow to build, but we’re finally at a saturation point. Wikipedia, BoingBoing, WordPress, TwitPic: they’ll all be dark on January 18th. An anti-SOPA rally has been planned for tomorrow afternoon in New York. The list of companies supporting SOPA is long but shrinking, thanks in no small part to the emails and phone calls they’ve received in the last few months.

So keep calling. Keep emailing. Most of all, keep making it known that the internet was built on the same principles of freedom that this country was. It should be afforded to the same rights.

I am standing up to protect my rights to use the Internet in the way it was created in the areas of FREE SPEECH. The Internet was given to the people as a free tool of communicating with one another around the world creating the GLOBAL VILLAGE. It grows organically and is the virtual fabric of innovation, creation, writing, publishing and unleasing the power of unseen rewards. For example I wouldn’t have become a published author without the Internet. I don’t believe I would have graduated from college either if it were not for my ability to research through the Internet.

We will not go quietly into the night. Thank you WordPress, Wikipedia, and other large servers who are standing with the people on this important issue.

 

WordPress gives their annual reports on Blogs

Thought you would be interested in looking at WordPress annual report for posts on Happy Tonics Blog This a  sister Blog of Insectmonarca’s Blog at http://happytonics.wordpress.com/2011/annual-report/

I am going to try to find insectamonarca’s annual report now and will report back soon. I looked but couldn’t find the email.

A plant story waiting to be told


Single leaf of giant radweed

Single leaf of giant radweed

If you only knew how this story has been nagging me. I have been looking for the photos on and off for a few months now. Photographers, I admit that I haven’t kept up with filing photos in a file system on the computer. Cindy Dyer, Dyer Design, told me she sorts though her photos daily and deletes those she doesn’t want and files the others in folders. It was this past summer when I saw a tall plant with multiple shaped leaves growing in my garden on the back side of the house. I would look out the window and say to myself, “What is that?” Do you notice the serrated leaves? They look like tiny teeth.

On close examination it had a familiar seed head. The leaves were unique in different shapes such as a single leaf and sometimes three to five lobes. I absolutely couldn’t identify the plant using any of my extensive wildflower plant books. It isn’t often than I am stumped by a plant.

Five lobes leaf

Five lobes leaf

I emailed a knowledgeable instructor at Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College in Hayward, WI. I had studied natural resources with him.  Larry Baker has an intimate knowledge of plants and I figured if anyone knew this plant, he would.

The seed head was green. We went back and forth a few times until Larry looked up the plant key identification. I should have gone here but I didn’t. I hope he doesn’t think I am lazy. A surprise email came that asked, “Could it be Giant Ragweed?” I could have blushed because I then realized I did recognize the seed head. Yes indeed, it was this plant. The Latin name is Ambrosia trifida and the noxious weed is also known as Buffaloweed.

Great ragweed seed head. Great ragweed seed head.

How did it come to be living in my native wildflower garden? I have no idea how it got there. The plant prefers fertile moist soils. I had mulched this area with garden leaf compost a few years ago. The soil was dark and moist. Beyond the drip line of my home, all the water slopes downwards through a wood chip filter and throughout the garden bed. It must have been a male plant because the flowers were abundant in spike like clusters located on the tips of branches and stems. Female flowers are few without petals located in the axils of the upper leaves.

Leaves are opposite, large and slightly hairy, entire, or palmately cleft into 3 or occasionally 5 lobes. The lobes are ovate-lanceolate and serrated. I was able to look up the plant afterwards in a book that Ed, an elder friend, gave me a few years back. I never dreamed I would be identifying noxious weeds from this source but as you can see, I am. My books are my refuge.

Source: U.S. Department of agriculture, Selected Weeds of the United States, 1970.

Environmental Film Fest – January 24 – Northwest Wisconsin

Environmental Film Fest

January 24 – 12 Noon
Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College
13566 W Trepania Road
Hayward, WI

Film: WATERBUSTERS explores the effects of the Gannon Dam on the Missouri River and how a family, which is one of the WATERBUSTER clan, was torn apart and their journey back to wholeness again. Susan Menzel, Tribal collage intern, stated she watched the film and drew parallels about Lac Courte Oreilles history. There was a time when the tribe was flooded to create the Chippewa Flowage in 1924 and the Winter Dam was installed. The Dam was turned over to LCO in the 1970s.  Speaker to be announced.  The event is open to the public.

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