First Parish UU Ftchburgm MA

drumcircle 001Today was a sample of how one can worship. We celebrated our selves and Creator.

Dave Curry is a master drummer. He came to lead us today in a primal communication with Mother Earth’s Heart Beat. Drums have honored Creation and the Creator for thousands of years by Native Americans and tribal people from around the world.

I brought an Africal hand drum that Sheila Lumi gave me. She knew that eventually I would be able to play it at the Drummers Circle on First Thursdays. Sometimes I make it there after exhibiting at the Farmers Market, at Fitchburg Art Museum, on First Thursday, that is if I have any energy left.

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Today was unique. Loved the chant: The Earth is Our Mother (repeat each line twice)

The Earth is our mother, we must take care of her;  Hey yung a-ho yung, a-hey yung yung

The Sky is our Father, we will take care of him; Hey yung a-ho yung, a-hey yung yung

The Sea is our Sister, we will take care of her; Hey yung a-ho yung, a-hey yung yung

The Forest is our Brother, we will take care of him; Hey yung a-ho yung, a-hey yung yung

The Earth is our mother, we must take care of her; Hey yung a-ho yung, a-hey yung yung

I can only remember how we chanted the first part. I guess I will make up the rest of the melody, until I hear it again.

Perhaps the following will be some help with translation:

The Earth is Our Mother

 The earth is our mother, we must take care of her
The earth is our mother, we must take care of her
Hey yunga, ho yunga, hey yung, yung
Hey yunga, ho yunga, hey yung, yung

(Her sacred ground we walk upon,with every step we take)

 (The sky is our father, we must take care of him)

 (His sacred air we breathe it in, with every breath we take)

http://www.newview.org/salem/earth_songs.htm

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Fitchburg MA Events and Blizzard

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First Thursday was a splash. Many people attending the Fitchburg Farmers Market at the Fitchburg Art Museum. Nick Capasso, new director, was on hand to greet visitors, Museum staff served refreshments.

My Name is Butterfly attends Farmers Market

My Name is Butterfly attends Farmers Market

I tended the community table on the second floor where my book My Name is Butterfly was available. Robert Lanciani of www.ishootwildlife.com  and Terry Impostato, Semi Precious Gem Treasures, had tables. I purchased a pair of turquoise drop earrings from Terry.

Terry's earrings I bought

Terry’s earrings I bought

Sheila Lumi and Christine Brown

Sheila Lumi and Christine Brown

Sheila Lumi, Director of the Fitchburg Farmers Market, brought honey to sell. People bought it by the pound, because it is local honey. I bought a bottle too. We know local honey is good for allergies, cold and flu. When I came home I tasted it; the honey tastes like delicate flowers. It is that good. A Spoonful of Medicine says, “Honey has been shown to have potent antibiotic properties. Scientists have discovered that it naturally produces hydrogen peroxide, a substance capable of killing disease-causing bacteria.”

Read the full article at http://www.creators.com/health/rallie-mcallister-your-health/a-spoonful-of-honey-is-good-medicine.html

Vee Lashua sold organic vegetables, eggs and meat to a sold out crowd. Her spicy grass fed beef chili was delicious and I bought a cup. I bought a steak, which defrosted overnight and cut into five portions.

Organic beef stew

Organic beef stew

I cooked the meat up with tomatoes, onions, fresh baby portabella mushrooms, with vinegar and butter. One portion was used in the slow cooker. I made delicious stew with tiny potatoes, onions, mushrooms, garlic, bite size tomatoes, carrots, celery and fresh dandelion greens from the market.

Charlie Red House Farm

Charlie Red House Farm

Charlie grew dandelion and other greens, at Red House Farm greenhouse. He had beautiful greens for sale. Next month I am going to buy a lot more. There was quite a selection of bagged green and purple lettuce also. The carrots were beautiful.

Charlie's gorgeous carrots

Charlie’s gorgeous carrots

Diane Burnette

Diane Burnette

I met Diane Burnette. She and her husband run Johnny Appleseed Visitors Center, in Lancaster, MA. Visit them at www.appleseed.org They sold darling children’s books about Johnny Appleseed. She offered MA maple syrup and other home grown products. Diane uses the Farmers Market to connect and network with community. In greeting guests, I met grade school teachers. They took butterfly postcards and business cards. Now teachers know that I am available for environmental and butterfly classroom talks. They can contact me at www.butterflywomanpublishing.com   I will be mailing Diane postcards of my books. She thought there might be an interest for the books at Johnny Appleseed Visitors Center.

Afterwards several of us went to First Parish UU, on the Upper Common, to attend First Thursday Drum Circle. I love this time to unwind. I brought a squash rattle, noticed some brought bells. Next month I am going to bring bells, clapping sticks, and rattles. I am new to drumming. The music takes me to an inner, deep and calming space. You may be interested in reading an article “Research indentifies health benefits from participation in drumming circles,” by Kimberly Ann Holle, Columbus United Examiner at

http://www.examiner.com/article/research-identifies-health-benefits-from-participation-drumming-circles

Blizzard in Fitchburg

Blizzard in Fitchburg

Friday the weather turned into The Blizzard of 2013. Fitchburg had a snow fall of 23.5 inches of snow overnight. The Governor told everyone to stay home. If you were caught out driving you could have gone to prison. People paid attention. I was perfectly safe up here on the 9th floor. It is a little nest and I am self contained. As of 4 p.m. today, the Governor announced that vehicles could use the roads again.

Digging out

Digging out

Be happy Butterfly Woman friends.

First Thursdays in Fitchburg MA

The city of Fitchburg, Massachusetts, comes alive the First Thursday of each month. Several events have been ongoing for months if not years.

Butterfly Woman Publishing

Butterfly Woman Publishing

For the first time, Butterfly Woman Publishing, Inc. www.butterfly-woman-publishing.com  participated as a Vendor at the First Thursday Fitchburg Farmers Market, at Fitchburg Art Museum. The museum welcomes the community to participate at the museum, FOR FREE, on the First Thursday of each month. Through a generous grant, Ward Four residents are granted an annual free membership. First Thursday at the museum is dedicated to the Fitchburg Farmers Market. Other events may occur on the same evening, which proves to enhance the event. More traffic is generated when different functions take place.

The Fiddler's Gardens

The Fiddler’s Gardens Steve and Sue

Last night was no exception. Sheila Lumi, Community Organizer, invited Steve and Sue of The Fiddler’s Gardens to play Celtic music. Sue plays fiddle and Steve plays guitar. I absolutely loved it. I am sold on the idea of partnering.

I am a member of Fitchburg Art Museum and Fitchburg Farmers Market Association. Can you imagine setting up a table next to the Hudson River School Painting Exhibit? Yes, there are several rooms devoted to American Scenery: Different Views in Hudson River School Painting, on exhibit through June 2.  There was also art on the walls where I was stationed. It is a tremendous privilege to be part of this program. I was raised in Saratoga Springs, New York, home to the oldest thoroughbred horse races in the world. Saratoga is near the Hudson River with its magnificent views. Fitchburg Art Museum has landscape paintings of Lake George and Seneca Lake, which are right in my childhood backyard.

VeeLashua Vee Lashua and her son Zack, student St. Andrews School, were selling fresh eggs, vegetables, and organic meat. I bought two pounds of grass fed ground beef and pork chops last month. This month I bought two dozen eggs (yes they are that good), cut kale, and beets. Vee’s crops are delicious and the pork chops are the best I have ever eaten. Zack was selling fresh made “Award Winning” chili that his mother had made. I had a bowl and suggested Vee make chili again for next month. It was delicious. They also served hot chocolate.

Nick Capasso and Terry Impostato

Nick Capasso and Terry Impostato

Nick Capasso, new 10th Director of the Fitchburg Art Museum, stopped by to introduce himself. Nick says, “I am proud to join a museum with deep ties to its community – in Fitchburg and in the surrounding towns and cities in Central New England.” Next month I learned that Nick is planning to host an informal meet and greet reception where he will greet museum visitors.  This is why I love the art scene here. Everyone is on the same playing field when it comes to promoting Fitchburg to the World.

Terry Impostato of Semi Precious Gem Treasures assisted me by restoring some old family jewelry necklaces that had broken. Both were from the 1940s or earlier. The seed pearl necklace is gorgeous now set with some red inland stones and the cinnabar necklace has been interlaced with black onyx. I am well pleased. Now I can start to plan to buy some jewelry each month.

Duffy Lanciani of I shoot Wildlife.

Duffy Lanciani of I shoot Wildlife.

Robert “Duffy” Lanciani was there last night representing his wife Mary, who was ill. Mary is a fabulous photographer. Matter of fact, I bought two of her photos made up as greeting cards. Naturally one was a wet monarch and the other was a standing bear in fall. They both shoot nature, wildlife, artistic impressions. Check them out at www.ishootwildlife.com

Janice Oikelmus recently relocated to Fitchburg from San Francisco.

Janice Oikelmus recently relocated to Fitchburg from San Francisco.

Afterwards, I walked over to First Parish Church to participate in the monthly First Thursday Drummers Group that starts at 7 p.m. The music led me to the meeting room. How warm it was to see a Music Alter set with instruments around the lit candles set for intention.

Music alter honoring intentions

Music alter honoring intentions

Some participants’ play drums; others played talking sticks, flutes and wind primitive handmade instruments, while melodic drumming kept the beat.

Sacred gourd

Sacred gourd

I immediately fell into a meditative mood and played my gourd rattle that I grew and dried. Nature provides musical instruments.  I would have liked to stay longer, but it had been a long day already.  I did a wrap within an hour and walked home with Glenda Littlehale. We both live at The Sundial.

One can only anticipate that things are getting better in downtown Fitchburg. The more we partner and enjoy the fruits of our labors, the better we become.

Fitchburg’s Winter Farmers Market is a new spin for a Museum

Once a month, the Fitchburg Art Museum is a host site for the Fitchburg Farmers Market, which takes place every first Thursday, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., January – June. Local growers and artisans, come to sell local grown or frozen grass fed beef, pork and poultry, eggs and handcrafted products. 

ImageIt was a joy to meet local farmers. I met Vee Lashua, owner of Brookside Family Farm, Westminister MA. Fresh farm eggs, winter crops such as Brussels sprouts, turnips, carrots and frozen grass feed beef and pork chops were purchased. When I returned home I cooked up the Brussels sprouts and devoured them in one sitting.

ImageSilver Oak Farm in Ashby is home to alpacas. Pam Welty, owner, sold me two pairs of Alpaca Survival Socks with a blend of spun alpaca wool. These will be Christmas presents.

ImageI bought hearty fresh baked bread by Hearth Fire Traveling Wood Fired Cuisine. Scott and Kerry Metcalf are the owners. I purchased a loaf of spiced apple cider and raisin bread. On Sunday after church, my sister made us a breakfast at Winter Hill Farm. We enjoyed the bread at that time. 

 Growing Places Garden Project was also there. I had an opportunity to speak with Anna Finstein, an AmeriCorps volunteer. I plan to collaborate with the project to educate children about growing food at school and in city backyard gardens. I will be representing Happy Tonics, headquartered in northwest WI. As a board member of the nonprofit environmental education organization, I look forward sharing garden information with gardeners in my new city.  As a published author, I write about pollinator corridors and monarch butterflies, I look forward to teaching children about monarch butterfly habitat and native plants that are necessary to the butterfly’s survival. It is thrilling to know that I can have my very own garden plot, in the park, in front of The Sundial, the building where I live, thanks to Growing Places Garden Project.

ImageTerry Impostato, owner of Semi Precious Gem Treasures, had an inviting display of fine art jewelry. I asked Terry to repair two necklaces that I had saved for years. One is a pearl necklace from Japan, probably from the 1940s; the other is a cinnabar necklace. She told me that cinnabar was a byproduct and at one time was a toxic waste product. Now it is beautiful carved beads that have separated from the string.

 According to http://www.chinafinds.com/cinnabar-guide.html  Cinnabar, also known as Chinese Lacquer, is a famous Chinese handicraft. Traditionally, cinnabar items were created by painting multiple layers of lacquer onto an item, letting the item dry between each coat, and then carving the resulting layers of lacquer into beautiful patterns. Cinnabar gets its name from the toxic red mineral cinnabar (mercury sulfide) that was once used to give the distinctive red color to the lacquer used in the process. Lynda Ireland, a friend, had given me the broken necklace years ago. It is only now that I am having the necklace repaired, at least 12 years later.

 In the future, I plan to interview other vendors in order for readers to learn about Fitchburg Art Museum and the wonderful programs that are happening there.

Till then, be happy butterfly friends wherever you are.

Night at a museum

Night at a museum

http://www.centralmass.org/media-center/releases/night-museum-celebrate-peter-timms%C2%B9-accomplishments-november-10th

Central Massachusetts Convention  and Visitors Bureau photo Peter Timms

dsc_1102_0December 6, 2012 – The Annual Meeting at the Fitchburg Art Museum took place. It was a farewell event for Peter Timms, Director 1973 – 2012. A film Masterpiece in a Mill Town, directed by Emily Driscoll, Fitchburg native, featured the founding of the museum to present day. Timms had the vision to make the art collection grow from private art collections to museum holdings. The museum also displays visiting and loaned art. Timms was masterful at raising millions of dollars to bring the Fitchburg Art Museum up to its present life.

Peter Timms and Eleanor Norcross (1854 – 1923) had big dreams.Eleanor Norcross Eleanor had the vision of wanting citizens to experience art as she had witnessed in Paris in the 19th Century. She was an exceptional artist and an independent young woman, ahead of her time.

Peter Timms carried on the vision of wanting the museum to come alive through education. He learned of one school that experienced an average of 50 percent dropout in the mid grades. With fortitude, he carved the idea of teaching children through art at the museum. Students learned about Egyptian art. Through this medium they learned science, math, geography, and other important subjects that make young minds excel. Through educational programs, many once absentee students became engaged in learning at the museum. The school was the former home of Eleanor Norcross. It was heartbreak to Timms when the school closed.

To spur growth through education, the museum opens its door the first Thursday of each month. The museum invites citizens to come and enjoy the museum free of charge.

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